Hunts and Cambs 01223 233047
Peterborough 01733 553166

Hunts and Cambs 01223 233047
Peterborough 01733 553166

FAQs - General Frequently Asked Questions about CCC

People often seek counselling when they are feeling depressed, isolated or have relationship difficulties. For instance, when you experience:

  • relationship problems
  • career or work life balance challenges
  • stress
  • anxiety
  • experience bereavement and other losses
  • lack confidence
  • feel lonely and unheard
  • are depressed
  • have phobias

CCC aims to provide affordable counselling that is accessible and fair to all.  CCC therefore operates on a reducing sliding scale based on gross income which makes our counselling more accessible to people on lower incomes.   Our reception counsellor is professionally trained and experienced and can discuss this with you in confidence.

This is extremely rare due to the care taken by the receptionist counsellor to place you with a counsellor best suited.  However, as a professional organisation, CCC has processes and procedures which you will be made aware of at the reception stage, allowing you to move forward with confidence.

Because we have many different counsellors, if you are not happy with the counsellor you are seeing, simply contact reception and arrange to transfer to someone else.  Your notes can be passed on so that you don't need to go over everything from the beginning.

The assessment session offers you the opportunity to outline and consider the issues that are concerning you.  The session also helps to clarify whether CCC can offer the most appropriate form of counselling for you.  If we can’t then we can offer advice as to where to go next.

An assessment session can last from between an hour and an hour and a half.

Each session usually lasts 50 minutes to an hour depending on the counsellor.

In a totally private environment where you will be comfortable and can talk in confidence. One of the considerations of the receptionist includes convenience for clients regarding location.

We offer weekly sessions, however this can vary depending on the type of therapy and your personal needs.  You can discuss this at your assessment session.

As a minimum CCC counsellors are required to provide evidence of having completed a course of training involving a minimum of 300 – 400 hours of continuous theory and skills over a period of three years.  They also have to show that they have completed 150 hours of supervised practice during and after the training course.

Careful listening is the largest part of what all counsellors do.

They make sure you have defined the problem areas in your own way and help you decide what you wish to do next.

Some will then be more proactive, offering suggestions for more exploration or beginning to resolve the problems; others are less so and let the work proceed more at your pace.

There are no hard and fast rules. If something is troubling you it can be worth spending some time thinking about why this may be happening. There are, however, a number of issues that frequently come up, for example:

Relationship difficulties: family and friends, colleagues, commitment, jealousy, abuse
Family issues: partners, children, parenting, separation and divorce
Lack of confidence: worried about failing, never being good enough, feeling judged
Depression: feeling isolated, lonely, empty, tearful, unloved, suicidal
Self-harming behaviours: binge eating, cutting, abusive relationships, alcohol, drugs
Bereavement: loss, anger, loneliness, sadness, depression

The counsellor can also direct you to other services that may be useful to you.

You can say whatever you like.

Sometimes there is silence; sometimes you might find yourself saying things you had not expected to say.

The counsellor will help you explore what is going on for you and will keep referring to you to clarify his/her understanding.

Counsellors don't ever give advice like, "I'd leave your job if I was you." The purpose of counselling is to help you make your own decision.

They will never make a moral decision about the course of action you ought to take.
They may sum up what they understand you have been saying so far in order to help you move forward.

They can offer pointers to how others have successfully dealt with common problems and may also make suggestions such as, "I wonder if you have thought of ..."

These suggestions will be drawn from their training in what is helpful and their experience of what has helped others in the past.  You can decide whether or not these suggestions are helpful to you.

Many people think that they are being strong in not seeking help whereas in fact those who can face up to their difficulties could be considered the strong ones.

Asking for counselling often means you have taken the first difficult step on the road to resolving the problem.

Our counsellors work to a strict Code of Ethics which means they must inform you of the limits of confidentiality and then stick to these rules.  This will be discussed with you at the assessment session.